2017 Top 100 MLB Prospects

Below is a list of the top 100 prospects in MLB, as compiled by a non-scout. With spring training starting up, what better time to begin prospecting for your fantasy teams than right now. Click on the links below to view each player’s Baseball Reference page. Brief writeups for top 25 only. Enjoy, comment, and share…share a lot!

He has filled out and will fill up the stat sheets in 2017 Courtesy: Boston Herald
He has filled out and will fill up the stat sheets in 2017
Courtesy: Boston Herald

1. Andrew Benintendi, OF, BOS: Added muscle to an already incredibly talented skill-set could lead to immediate stardom in 2017.

2. Alex Reyes, RHP, STL: Suspensions are behind him. It won’t be long until he’s 1b behind Carlos Martinez.
3. Lucas Giolito, RHP, CHW: Remember the elbow issues and the babying. He’ll get a grasp on location and he’ll take off.
One of several pieces from the Sale trade, Moncada is a freak Courtesy: Zimbio
One of several pieces from the Sale trade, Moncada is a freak
Courtesy: Zimbio

4. Yoan Moncada, 2B, CHW: Freak athlete. The numbers from a 2B will make fantasy players drool.

5. J.P. Crawford, SS, PHI: Don’t expect Jimmy Rollins in his game. He’ll begin to impress as soon as he gets his first shot due to a solid approach and all-around game.
6. Dansby Swanson, SS, ATL: Atlanta will be better in their new stadium. Swanson will be one of the reasons why. Getting him for Shelby Miller will be the Braves’ version of the Jeff Bagwell deal.
7. Rafael Devers, 3B, BOS: Power potential for days. He’s going to be special.
8. Gleyber Torres, SS, NYY: The power is coming. At 19 in A+, he had 11 HR and 29 doubles. It’s a race to SS between Torres and Mateo in NY.
9. Brendan Rodgers, SS, COL: There is a lot more swing and miss in his game than Troy Tulowitzki’s, but he’ll be compared to him his entire career – and for good reason.
10. Tyler Glasnow, RHP, PIT: The control can still be an issue, but Glasnow has the right pitching coach to make him an elite arm.
Robles is still in the Nats' organization for a reason Courtesy: MiLB.com
Robles is still in the Nats’ organization for a reason
Courtesy: MiLB.com

11. Victor Robles, OF, WAS: A gifted athlete with a crazy contact rate (especially for a 19-year-old in A+), he’ll utilize the entire field and be a threat on the bases.

12. Cody Bellinger, 1B/OF, LAD: He has nowhere to play until Adrian Gonzalez leaves after the 2018 season, but he’s nearly ready. Maybe they’ll make room for him in the OF.
13. Austin Meadows, OF, PIT: All of the McCutcheon rumors will lead to a lot of focus on Meadows. He won’t be a star but can do a lot of things well.
14. Bradley Zimmer, OF, CLE: The strikeouts are a huge concern but Zimmer is a unique talent and brings a skill-set that will improve an already impressive roster in Cleveland.
The Reds need a quick moving power bat. He's the guy Courtesy: redsminorleagues.com
The Reds need a quick moving power bat. He’s the guy
Courtesy: redsminorleagues.com

15. Nick Senzel, 3B, CIN: Think of Ryan Zimmerman when you think of how quickly a player can reach the majors here. He could also produce at the same level…hopefully without the injuries.

16. Anderson Espinoza, RHP, SD: There are still a lot of things that can go wrong (he doesn’t turn 19 until March), but there are so many things that are already intriguing here.
17. Lewis Brinson, OF, MIL: Making contact consistently is a concern, but, when he does, Brinson is capable of superstardom in Milwaukee.
18. Eloy Jimenez, OF, CHC: 40 doubles at 19 in the midwest league. He’s going to turn those into HR in 2017 and he’ll be a top 5 prospect in 2018.
19. Manuel Margot, OF, SD: His numbers won’t pop and he may never lead the league in any statistic, but Margot is a smooth baseball player. He can do it all.
20. Josh Bell, 1B/OF, PIT: He never showed the power potential he was supposed to have in the minors, but he’s still a work in progress – one with an approach beyond his years.
Frazier will be an asset for the Yankees, even if it hurt to give up Miller Courtesy: Stack.com
Frazier will be an asset for the Yankees, even if it hurt to give up Miller
Courtesy: Stack.com

21. Clint Frazier, OF, NYY: The hair may be what many know him for right now. The ability will make others wish that they had curly red hair.

22. Kyle Tucker, OF, HOU: As this guy grows into his 6’4″ frame, he’s going to be a monster. He had 41 XBH and 32 SB while reading A+ at 19 in 2016.
23. Michael Kopech, RHP, CHW: He throws really hard and he’s on a team that is going to give him an opportunity sooner than later. If for no other reason than these, he’s an intriguing prospect. He’s also very good.
24. Willy Adames, SS, TB: He’ll make the David Price trade look silly at some point when he debuts in 2017. He is extremely talented and will quickly become one of the Rays’ top players.
25. Francis Martes, RHP, HOU: Strikeouts jumped a bit (as did the walks) in AA last year, a wonderful sign for a 20-year-old. He throws extremely hard and is capable of becoming a frontline starter.
26. Amed Rosario, SS, NYM
27. Ian Happ, 2B/OF, CHC
28. Ozzie Albies, 2B/SS, ATL
30. Kyle Lewis, OF, SEA
31. Mickey Moniak, OF, PHI
32. Franklin Barreto, 2B/SS, OAK
33. Francisco Mejia, C, CLE
34. Jose De Leon, RHP, TB
35. Corey Ray, OF, MIL
36. Hunter Renfroe, OF, SD
37. Brent Honeywell, RHP, TB
38. Josh Hader, LHP, MIL
39. Jason Groome, LHP, BOS
40. Jeff Hoffman, RHP, COL
41. Tyler O’Neill, OF, SEA
42. Reynaldo Lopez, RHP, CHW
43. Kolby Allard, LHP, ATL
44. Raimel Tapia, OF, COL
45. Mitch Keller, RHP, PIT
46. Blake Rutherford, OF, NYY
47. Braxton Garrett, LHP, MIA
48. Jorge Alfaro, C, PHI
49. Yohander Mendez, LHP, TEX
50. Anthony Alford, OF, TOR
51. Carson Kelly, C, STL
52. Luis Castillo, RHP, CIN
53. Yadier Alvarez, RHP, LAD
54. Vladimir Guerrero, Jr., 3B/OF, TOR
55. Jorge Mateo, SS, NYY
56. Leody Taveras, OF, TEX
57. Riley Pint, RHP, COL
58. Dominic Smith, 1B, NYM
59. Sean Reid-Foley, RHP, TOR
60. Nick Gordon, SS, MIN
61. David Paulino, RHP, HOU
62. Amir Garrett, LHP, CIN
63. Aaron Judge, OF, NYY
64. Triston McKenzie, RHP, CLE
65. Kevin Newman, SS, PIT
66. Alex Verdugo, OF, LAD
67. Nick Williams, OF, PHI
68. Zack Collins, C, CHW
69. Delvin Perez, SS, STL
70. A.J. Puk, LHP, OAK
71. Grant Holmes, RHP, OAK
72. Brady Aiken, LHP, CLE
73. Robert Stephenson, RHP, CIN
74. Jesse Winker, OF, CIN
75. Erick Fedde, RHP, WAS
76. Willie Calhoun, 2B, LAD
77. Dylan Cease, RHP, CHC
78. Jake Bauers, 1B/OF, TB
79. Luke Weaver, RHP, STL
80. Justus Sheffield, LHP, NYY
81. Sean Newcombe, LHP, ATL
82. Matt Manning, RHP, DET
83. Brock Stewart, RHP, LAD
84. Max Fried, LHP, ATL
85. Derek Fisher, OF, HOU
86. Ian Anderson, RHP, ATL
87. Chance Sisco, C, BAL
88. Forrest Whitley, RHP, HOU
89. Stephen Gonsalves, LHP, MIN
90. Kevin Maitan, SS, ATL
91. Matt Chapman, 3B, OAK
92. Tyler Jay, LHP, MIN
93. Cal Quantrill, RHP, SD
94. Bobby Bradley, 1B, CLE
95. Christian Arroyo, INF, SF
96. Mike Soroka, RHP, ATL
97. Isan Diaz, SS, MIL
98. Ramon Laureano, OF, HOU
99. Tyler Beede, RHP, SF
100. German Marquez, RHP, COL

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2016 Midseason Top 100 Prospects

At the beginning of the 2016 season, I prepared a prospect list. Now, at the mid-point of the season, it is time to look at how that list has changed; whether because of performance or promotions, you’ll see a drastically different list of players to keep an eye on over the remainder of the 2016 season. (Click on the hyperlink to view the player page through Baseball Reference)

  1. Julio Urias, LHP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    Dodgers LHP phenom Julio Urias
    Dodgers LHP phenom Julio Urias
  2. Lucas Giolito, RHP, Washington Nationals
  3. Yoan Moncada, 2B, Boston Red Sox
  4. J.P. Crawford, SS, Philadelphia Phillies
  5. Alex Reyes, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
  6. Tyler Glasnow, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates
  7. Alex Bregman, 3B/SS, Houston Astros
  8. Brendan Rodgers, SS, Colorado Rockies
  9. Trea Turner, SS/CF, Washington Nationals
  10. Orlando Arcia, SS, Milwaukee Brewers
  11. Dansby Swanson, SS, Atlanta Braves
  12. Austin Meadows, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates
  13. Joey Gallo, 3B, Texas Rangers
  14. Andrew Benintendi, OF, Boston Red Sox
  15. Victor Robles, OF, Washington Nationals
  16. Anderson Espinoza, RHP, Boston Red Sox
  17. David Dahl, OF, Colorado Rockies
  18. Amed Rosario, SS, New York Mets
  19. Rafael Devers, 3B, Boston Red Sox
  20. Ozzie Albies, 2B/SS, Atlanta Braves
  21. Manuel Margot, OF, San Diego Padres
  22. Clint Frazier, OF, Cleveland Indians

    Indians Ginger Clint Frazier
    Indians Ginger Clint Frazier
  23. Lewis Brinson, OF, Texas Rangers
  24. Jeff Hoffman, RHP, Colorado Rockies
  25. Jorge Mateo, SS, New York Yankees
  26. Jose Berrios, RHP, Minnesota Twins
  27. Willy Adames, SS, Tampa Bay Rays
  28. Nick Williams, OF, Philadelphia Phillies
  29. Raul A. Mondesi, SS, Kansas City Royals
  30. Bradley Zimmer, OF, Cleveland Indians
  31. Raimel Tapia, OF, Colorado Rockies
  32. Eloy Jimenez, OF, Chicago Cubs
  33. Aaron Judge, OF, New York Yankees
  34. Gleyber Torres, SS, Chicago Cubs
  35. Jose De Leon, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers
  36. Josh Bell, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates
  37. Amir Garrett, LHP, Cincinnati Reds

    Reds' LHP Amir Garrett is still transitioning from basketball - even with his outrageous numbers. Courtesy: Reds Reporter
    Reds’ LHP Amir Garrett is still transitioning from basketball – even with his outrageous numbers.
    Courtesy: Reds Reporter
  38. Francis Martes, RHP, Houston Astros
  39. Brent Honeywell, RHP, Tampa Bay Rays
  40. Reynaldo Lopez, RHP, Washington Nationals
  41. Joe Musgrove, RHP, Houston Astros
  42. Kyle Tucker, OF, Houston Astros
  43. Cody Bellinger, 1B/OF, Los Angeles Dodgers
  44. Ian Happ, 2B/OF, Chicago Cubs
  45. Sean Newcomb, LHP, Atlanta Braves
  46. Jake Thompson, RHP, Philadelphia Phillies
  47. Nick Gordon, SS, Minnesota Twins
  48. Luis Ortiz, RHP, Texas Rangers
  49. Tyler Jay, LHP, Minnesota Twins
  50. Brett Phillips, OF, Milwaukee Brewers
  51. Hunter Renfroe, OF, San Diego Padres
  52. Franklin Barreto, SS, Oakland Athletics
  53. Yohander Mendez, LHP, Texas Rangers"Texas
  54. Alex Verdugo, OF, Los Angeles Dodgers
  55. Josh Hader, LHP, Milwaukee Brewers
  56. Jorge Alfaro, C, Philadelphia Phillies
  57. Kevin Newman, SS, Pittsburgh Pirates
  58. David Paulino, RHP, Houston Astros
  59. Phil Bickford, RHP, San Francisco Giants
  60. Tyler O’Neill, OF, Seattle Mariners
  61. Mitch Keller, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates
  62. Christian Arroyo, SS, San Francisco Giants
  63. Grant Holmes, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers
  64. Brady Aiken, LHP, Cleveland Indians
  65. Jake Bauers, 1B/OF, Tampa Bay Rays
  66. Robert Stephenson, RHP, Cincinnati Reds
  67. Erick Fedde, RHP, Washington Nationals
  68. Braden Shipley, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks
  69. Jesse Winker, OF, Cincinnati Reds
  70. Justus Sheffield, LHP, Cleveland Indians
  71. Trent Clark, OF, Milwaukee Brewers
  72. Jack Flaherty, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
  73. Bobby Bradley, 1B, Cleveland Indians
  74. Francisco Mejia, C, Cleveland Indians
  75. Gavin Cecchini, SS, New York Mets
  76. Dominic Smith, 1B, New York Mets

    Smith is a 1B-only prospect who is actually worth monitoring Courtesy: metsmorizedonline.com
    Smith is a 1B-only prospect who is actually worth monitoring
    Courtesy: metsmorizedonline.com
  77. Mike Soroka, RHP, Atlanta Braves
  78. Carson Fulmer, RHP, Chicago White Sox
  79. Andrew Knapp, C, Philadelphia Phillies
  80. Luke Weaver, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
  81. Frankie Montas, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers
  82. Mike Clevinger, RHP, Cleveland Indians
  83. Sean Reid-Foley, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays
  84. Kolby Allard, LHP, Atlanta Braves
  85. Ke’Bryan Hayes, 3B, Pittsburgh Pirates
  86. Anthony Alford, OF, Toronto Blue Jays
  87. Chris Shaw, 1B, San Francisco Giants
  88. Jorge Polanco, 2B, Minnesota Twins
  89. Hunter Harvey, RHP, Baltimore Orioles
  90. Javier Guerra, SS, San Diego Padres
  91. Tyler Beede, RHP, San Francisco Giants
  92. Adalberto Mejia, LHP, San Francisco Giants
  93. Derek Fisher, OF, Houston Astros
  94. Conner Greene, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays
  95. Touki Toussaint, RHP, Atlanta Braves
  96. Stephen Gonsalves, LHP, Minnesota Twins

    Gonsalves could be a top 50 prospect by the end of the year Courtesy: milb.com
    Gonsalves could be a top 50 prospect by the end of the year
    Courtesy: milb.com
  97. Michael Kopech, RHP, Boston Red Sox
  98. Yusniel Diaz, OF, Los Angeles Dodgers
  99. Josh Naylor, 1B, Miami Marlins
  100. James Kaprielian, RHP, New York Yankees

 

2016 MLB Prospects: Top 100 Prospects

As more and more teams look for young, controllable talent, it becomes necessary for baseball fans to become acquainted with the prospects within their system. Not only are these players capable of becoming the future stars of their teams, but they are also the chips that could be cashed in for more “ready” talent to get your team to the next level. As a fan, not a scout, I’ve compiled the Top 100 Prospects in Major League Baseball for your enjoyment. Get to know the following players:

1. Corey Seager, 3B/SS, Los Angeles Dodgers

The Dodgers are loaded with talent and Seager is monster of their talented group of prospects
The Dodgers are loaded with talent and Seager is monster of their talented group of prospects

2. Byron Buxton, OF, Minnesota Twins

3. Lucas Giolito, RHP, Washington Nationals

4. Julio Urias, LHP, Los Angeles Dodgers

5. J.P. Crawford, SS, Philadelphia Phillies

6. Joey Gallo, 3B/OF, Texas Rangers

7. Tyler Glasnow, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates

8. Nomar Mazara, OF, Texas Rangers

9. Trea Turner, 2B/SS, Washington Nationals

10. Rafael Devers, 3B, Boston Red Sox

11. Yoan Moncada, 2B, Boston Red Sox

12. Brendan Rodgers, SS, Colorado Rockies

13. Steven Matz, LHP, New York Mets

14. Dansby Swanson, SS, Atlanta Braves

15. Bradley Zimmer, OF, Cleveland Indians

16. Orlando Arcia, SS, Milwaukee Brewers

17. Aaron Judge, OF, New York Yankees

18. Jose Berrios, RHP, Minnesota Twins

19. Sean Newcomb, LHP, Atlanta Braves

20. Robert Stephenson, RHP, Cincinnati Reds

21. Jose De Leon, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers

22. Alex Bregman, SS, Houston Astros

23. Austin Meadows, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates

24. Franklin Barreto, SS, Oakland Athletics

25. Alex Reyes, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals

26. Manuel Margot, OF, San Diego Padres

27. Gleyber Torres, SS, Chicago Cubs

28. Jose Peraza, 2B, Cincinnati Reds

29. Jesse Winker, OF, Cincinnati Reds

Winker could be ready by the time the Reds find a taker for Jay Bruce
Winker could be ready by the time the Reds find a taker for Jay Bruce

30. Jon Gray, RHP, Colorado Rockies

31. Clint Frazier, OF, Cleveland Indians

32. Billy McKinney, OF, Chicago Cubs

33. Raul Mondesi, SS, Kansas City Royals

34. Josh Bell, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

35. Jeff Hoffman, RHP, Colorado Rockies

36. David Dahl, OF, Colorado Rockies

37. Ozhaino Albies, SS, Atlanta Braves

38. Willy Adames, SS, Tampa Bay Rays

39. Brett Phillips, OF, Milwaukee Brewers

40. Tim Anderson, SS, Chicago White Sox

41. Archie Bradley, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks

42. Jameson Taillon, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates

43. Jorge Alfaro, C, Philadelphia Phillies

44. Blake Snell, LHP, Tampa Bay Rays

45. Mark Appel, RHP, Philadelphia Phillies

46. Carson Fulmer, RHP, Chicago White Sox

47. Ryan McMahon, 3B, Colorado Rockies

48. Brent Honeywell, RHP, Tampa Bay Rays

49. Alex Jackson, OF, Seattle Mariners

50. Tyler Kolek, RHP, Miami Marlins

51. Nick Williams, OF, Philadelphia Phillies

52. Grant Holmes, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers

53. A.J. Reed, 1B, Houston Astros

54. Aaron Blair, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks

55. Jake Thompson, RHP, Philadelphia Phillies

56. Daz Cameron, OF, Houston Astros

57. Hunter Harvey, RHP, Baltimore Orioles

58. Dylan Bundy, RHP, Baltimore Orioles

Bundy still has the talent to be an ace - and he is another year removed from surgery
Bundy still has the talent to be an ace – and he is another year removed from surgery

59. Lewis Brinson, OF, Texas Rangers

60. Carl Edwards, Jr., RHP, Chicago Cubs

61. Andrew Benintendi, OF, Boston Red Sox

62. Francelis Montas, RHP, Chicago White Sox

63. Kyle Tucker, OF, Houston Astros

64. Alen Hanson, 2B/SS, Pittsburgh Pirates

65. Tyler Jay, LHP, Minnesota Twins

66. Touki Toussaint, RHP, Atlanta Braves

67. Amir Garrett, LHP, Cincinnati Reds

68. Rob Kaminsky, LHP, Cleveland Indians

69. Brandon Nimmo, OF, New York Mets

70. Duane Underwood, RHP, Chicago Cubs

71. Jorge Polanco, 2B/SS, Minnesota Twins

72. Nick Gordon, SS, Minnesota Twins

73. Javier Guerra, SS, San Diego Padres

74. Braden Shipley, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks

75. Forrest Wall, 2B, Colorado Rockies

76. Daniel Robertson, SS, Tampa Bay Rays

77. Trent Clark, OF, Milwaukee Brewers

78. Amed Rosario, SS, New York Mets

79. Hunter Renfroe, OF, San Diego Padres

80. Jonathan Harris, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays

81. Garrett Whitley, OF, Tampa Bay Rays

82. Kolby Allard, RHP, Atlanta Braves

83. Gavin Cecchini, SS, New York Mets

84. Dominic Smith, 1B, New York Mets

85. Jorge Mateo, SS, New York Yankees

86. Cornellus Randolph, OF, Philadelphia Phillies

87. Luis Ortiz, RHP, Texas Rangers

88. Ashe Russell, RHP, Kansas City Royals

89. Mike Nikorak, RHP, Colorado Rockies

90. Tyler Stephenson, C, Cincinnati Reds

91. Albert Almora, OF, Chicago Cubs

92. Max Kepler, OF, Minnesota Twins

93. Michael Fulmer, RHP, Detroit Tigers

94. Kyle Zimmer, RHP, Kansas City Royals

95. Anthony Alford, OF, Toronto Blue Jays

96. Keury Mella, RHP, Cincinnati Reds

97. Raimel Tapia, OF, Colorado Rockies

98. Brady Aiken, LHP, Cleveland Indians

Aiken could be a steal for the Indians, who continue to grow an interesting farm
Aiken could be a steal for the Indians, who continue to grow an interesting farm

99. Jack Flaherty, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals

100. Brian Johnson, LHP, Boston Red Sox

 

2015 Mid-Season Top 50 Prospects

I published my Top 100 prospect list for the 2015 season in late October. Since then, we’ve seen numerous players jump to the majors to be contributors at the big league level. As you likely heard a million times during All-Star Week, there are a lot of very good young players in MLB right now. Fortunately, there are still many to come, and here are the top 50 prospects remaining in the minors:

NOTE: Since this is a mid-season list, I am not going to go in-depth with reporting at this time. If you’d like to see more, follow the link to the statistics from Baseball Reference and view how each prospect is performing, or feel free to comment for specific questions on players and I’ll provide a response.

Seager could make the same type of impact as Joc Pederson, only at SS
Seager could make the same type of impact as Joc Pederson, only at SS Courtesy: CBS Sports

1. Corey Seager, SS, Los Angeles Dodgers

2. Lucas Giolito, RHP, Washington Nationals

3. Julio Urias, LHP, Los Angeles Dodgers

4. J.P. Crawford, SS, Philadelphia Phillies

5. Joey Gallo, 3B, Texas Rangers

6. Kyle Schwarber, C, Chicago Cubs (on his way to the majors to fill in for the injured Miguel Montero)

7. Tyler Glasnow, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates

8. Nomar Mazara, OF, Texas Rangers

9. Trea Turner, SS, Washington Nationals

10. Aaron Nola, RHP, Philadelphia Phillies

11. Rafael Devers, 3B, Boston Red Sox

12. Yoan Moncada, 2B, Boston Red Sox

13. Brendan Rodgers, SS, Colorado Rockies

14. Bradley Zimmer, OF, Cleveland Indians

Cards future ace?  Courtesy: MLB.com
Cards future ace?
Courtesy: MLB.com

15. Alex Reyes, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals

16. Michael Conforto, OF, New York Mets

17. Robert Stephenson, RHP, Cincinnati Reds

18. Jose Berrios, RHP, Minnesota Twins

19. Orlando Arcia, SS, Milwaukee Brewers

20. Nick Williams, OF, Texas Rangers

21. Austin Meadows, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates

22. Jose De Leon, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers

23. Daniel Norris, LHP, Toronto Blue Jays

24. Gleyber Torres, SS, Chicago Cubs

25. Raul Mondesi, SS, Kansas City Royals

26. Luis Severino, RHP, New York Yankees (could be a reliever long-term)

Rockies' OF Tapia may be small, but he can HIT - and to all fields
Rockies’ OF Tapia may be small, but he can HIT – and to all fields

27. Raimel Tapia, OF, Colorado Rockies

28. Aaron Judge, OF, New York Yankees

29. Billy McKinney, OF, Chicago Cubs

30. Dansby Swanson, SS, Arizona Diamondbacks (remains unsigned prior to Friday’s deadline)

31. Jon Gray, RHP, Colorado Rockies

32. Jeff Hoffman, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays

33. Sean Newcomb, LHP, Los Angeles Angels

34. Josh Bell, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

35. Joe Ross, RHP, Washington Nationals

36. Brett Phillips, OF, Houston Astros

37. Franklin Barreto, SS, Oakland Athletics

38. David Dahl, OF, Colorado Rockies

39. Blake Snell, LHP, Tampa Bay Rays

40. Jesse Winker, OF, Cincinnati Reds

41. Aaron Blair, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks

42. Ryan McMahon, 3B, Colorado Rockies

43. Henry Owens, LHP, Boston Red Sox

Is Appel an ace or a bust?  Courtesy: Baseball America
Is Appel an ace or a bust?
Courtesy: Baseball America

44. Mark Appel, RHP, Houston Astros

45. Reynaldo Lopez, RHP, Washington Nationals

46. Tim Anderson, SS, Chicago White Sox

47. Willy Adames, SS, Tampa Bay Rays

48. Jorge Alfaro, C, Texas Rangers

49. Ozhaino Albies, SS, Atlanta Braves

50. A.J. Reed, 1B, Houston Astros

 

 

2014 Mid-Season Top 50 Prospects

At the halfway point of the 2014 season, it is time to take a look at some of the top prospects who are still hanging out on the farm developing their trade. Below, you will find the top 50 mid-season prospects for the 2014 season, with links to their statistics and a brief summary of their outlook. Enjoy. Share. Love.

 

Twins OF Byron Buxton
Twins OF Byron Buxton

1. Byron Buxton, OF, Minnesota Twins: Wrist injuries have hurt him this season, but the tools are still there to be a five-tool stud.

2. Kris Bryant, 3B, Chicago Cubs: The power is incredible, but not nearly as incredible as the overall numbers. Will he end up at third or the outfield? It doesn’t really matter where he ends up, he’s a star.

3. Carlos Correa, SS, Houston Astros: Correa’s season has been destroyed by a broken leg after he destroyed opposing pitchers in the California League. He was just about ready for a promotion to Double-A, so the timing was quite unfortunate. He remains a future star in Houston.

4. Addison Russell, SS, Chicago Cubs: It doesn’t matter who he plays for, Russell can hit, hit for power, show patience at the dish, and field his position. While the landing spot of the recent trade leads to a lot of questions, Russell’s overall skills could make him the best option at short for Chicago.

5. Javier Baez, SS, Chicago Cubs: The power and bat speed are tools that all others envy, but until Baez makes some adjustments with his all or nothing approach, he isn’t the top shortstop prospect in the minors – but where he ends up with a crowded Cubs’ system means little if he doesn’t start making more consistent contact and taking a few more pitches.

6. Francisco Lindor, SS, Cleveland Indians: He may not possess the power that the other prospects offer ahead of him, but Lindor will have plenty of value for the Indians, showcasing an elite glove, solid speed, an excellent approach, and more pop than you’d expect based on his frame (5’11”, 175 pounds).

7. Lucas Giolito, RHP, Washington Nationals: The fastball and curveball, right now, could dominate at the major league level. If he can stay healthy, he could supplant Stephen Strasburg as the Nats ace, not because Strasburg is aging – he is capable of being better.

8. Jon Gray, RHP, Colorado Rockies: Gray still has the fastball and slider that could dominate and he continues to refine the change. Just because he’s a Rockies’ pitcher, he shouldn’t be discounted. He has the stuff to throw the Coors effect out the window.

9. Dylan Bundy, RHP, Baltimore Orioles: The injury is damning but the results and stuff seem to be back already. Bundy’s velocity isn’t there, but the command is there, which is typically the last thing to return after TJ surgery. Four plus pitches and pitching intelligence make Bundy a frontline starter for the O’s.

10. Miguel Sano, 3B, Minnesota Twins: Sano is going to miss the entire 2014 season due to TJ surgery. His power is elite and he should get a long look next spring for a Twins club that is desperate for some offense.

 

Rangers 3B Joey Gallo
Rangers 3B Joey Gallo

11. Joey Gallo, 3B, Texas Rangers: The power was considered an 80 and it’s there. The plate discipline, however, has shown up and made Gallo an absolutely scary talent, especially when you consider the hitter-friendly nature of his home ballpark if he stays in Texas. Can he stay at third? Another guy who it shouldn’t matter for due to the bat playing anywhere.

12. Robert Stephenson, RHP, Cincinnati Reds: With three pitchers set to reach free agency after the 2015 season, Stephenson appears to be a solution, especially with strong results as he continues to climb through the Cincinnati system.

13. Archie Bradley, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks: The injury led to some stumble here, but Bradley, if healthy, just needs to get a firm grasp on his command to be a No.1 starter. It wasn’t always elite results for Matt Harvey and Gerrit Cole, so don’t sell him short due to the numbers this season.

14. Julio Urias, LHP, Los Angeles Dodgers: He’s 17 and in the California League dominating hitters. Urias has stuff and command to be a front-of-the-rotation arm, but with projection involved, the sky is the limit. Everything could get better for him as he matures.

15. Noah Syndergaard, RHP, New York Mets: Yet another injury-ravaged arm in 2014, “Thor” should be on the mound for the Mets at some point by the end of the season to gain some experience. He should be a very good No.2 starter for years to come, featuring electric stuff and top notch command.

16. Corey Seager, SS, Los Angeles Dodgers: A slugging shortstop, who may not stay at the position, in a system that continues to develop and acquire elite talent, Seager would be talked about a lot by teams who didn’t have Yasiel Puig and Clayton Kershaw around. Now, with Urias dominating at such a young age, Seager continues to not get the praise he deserves for the skills. California League or not, 1.037 OPS at the age of 20 is nothing to sneeze at.

17. David Dahl, OF, Colorado Rockies: A five-tool talent in Colorado…we’ve seen that before with Carlos Gonzalez and it’s nice. Dahl has the same type of potential.

18. Alex Meyer, RHP, Minnesota Twins: He’s a large man with No.2-No.3 stuff that could be No.1 stuff if he continues to show the type of command that he has in 2014. With the improvements that he has shown this season, he should be higher, but the shoulder issues that he had scare me off a bit.

19. Joc Pederson, OF, Los Angeles Dodgers: Pederson would likely be starting for half of MLB this season. Instead, he is depth due to the presence of Puig, Andre Ethier, Matt Kemp, and Carl Crawford. The strikeouts are up a bit this season, but he is showing more power, speed, and patience (which is confusing but the walks are up).

20. Hunter Harvey, RHP, Baltimore Orioles: Harvey will likely move very quickly for a high school arm, as he has shown electric stuff in his first full season for the O’s Low-A affiliate. Along with Dylan Bundy and Kevin Gausman, Harvey gives Baltimore one of the most, if not the most, prolific arms in the minors.

21. Blake Swihart, C, Boston Red Sox: A switch-hitting catcher with some pop and solid plate discipline skills who is getting better after a jump to Double-A, Swihart has established himself as one of the top catching prospects in the game, redefining his previous outlook with an excellent season.

22. Henry Owens, LHP, Boston Red Sox: While Owens isn’t going to replace Jon Lester at the top of the Boston rotation anytime soon, he should settle in as a very useful arm, capable of owning opposing batters with a strong fastball and very, very good change from the left side.

23. Austin Hedges, C, San Diego Padres: Hedges’ offensive game still needs a lot of work, but he could step behind the plate and be an effective game manager tomorrow. Could he hit enough to be an everyday catcher? Well, Ryan Hanigan has…and Yadier Molina wasn’t always the offensive monster that he is today. Things can change. He’s young enough to get the complete package together, but even if he doesn’t hit, he’s a Gold Glove catcher.

24. Daniel Norris, LHP, Toronto Blue Jays: Norris has jumped to Double-A after dominating the Florida State League in his first 13 starts of the season. He has the stuff to be an ace, and this ranking appears to be much lower than what he deserves considering the stuff and results, but there are a lot of solid arms ahead of him.

25. Tyler Glasnow, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates: The Pirates have a lot of very good, young arms in their system, and Glasnow could be the best if he finds a way to limit the walks. He’s big with big stuff, and just harnessing it would make him a top 10 prospect.

Cubs INF/OF Arismendy Alcantara
Cubs INF/OF Arismendy Alcantara

26. Arismendy Alcantara, 2B, Chicago Cubs: It’s unfortunate that it has to be repeated, but Alcantara’s future position in Chicago will be decided at some point between the Starlin Castro/Addison Russell/Javier Baez/Kris Bryant shuffle between second, third, and short, while Alcantara’s recent move to the outfield (he has played 10 games in center) could be a sign of the demise of Junior Lake, and the solution for the crowd – as far as how it impacts this very talented, 22-year-old speedster.

27. Kohl Stewart, RHP, Minnesota Twins: Likely to move slow due to the organizational philosophy, the Twins haven’t had a power arm like this that they drafted and developed as far back as I can remember. He is working on his secondary stuff in the Midwest League this season, so the numbers don’t show dominance like the stuff suggests. He’s still just 19 and he will be a huge part of the Twins system, settling in nicely behind Alex Meyer as a No.2 starter.

28. Aaron Sanchez, RHP, Toronto Blue Jays: Sanchez would likely be pitching in Toronto right now if he had the ability to harness the stuff. Instead, he has walked 55 in 92.1 innings as of July 8. If he can grasp some concept of command, he could be the top pitcher on this entire list. As is, he’s a work in progress and a huge chip if the Blue Jays were to go all-in despite their recent tumble in the AL East.

29. Jameson Taillon, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates: The results haven’t always matched the hype, but we’ll have to wait another year to see how Taillon’s stock fluctuates given his TJ surgery that has forced him to miss the entire 2014 season.

30. J.P. Crawford, SS, Philadelphia Phillies: Crawford has jumped to the Florida State League after a solid run in the Sally League, showing a tremendous approach for a 19-year-old at either level. He has surprising gap power and tremendous speed and he could be the next Jimmy Rollins in Philadelphia with a slightly better approach and a little less pop.

31. Raimel Tapia, OF, Colorado Rockies: Tapia’s ceiling is anyone’s guess, but he’s a 20-year-old in his first attempt at full-season ball, posting an .830 OPS with 19 stolen bases and 27 extra-base hits (as of July 8). He can barrel up practically anything and he could develop power with his 6’2″, 160 pound frame. He could be better than Dahl if everything clicks, but the worst case scenario could be a Dexter Fowler at his peak as his norm.

32. Jorge Alfaro, C, Texas Rangers: A catcher who can run, hit for extreme power, and throw absolute seeds from behind the dish aren’t the norm in baseball, which makes Alfaro a future stud. He has some holes in his swing, but he is just 21 and he has a huge ceiling due to the power and defensive prowess.

33. Albert Almora, OF, Chicago Cubs: Almora hasn’t lived up to the offensive expectations this season, but he still brings a lot to the table with his elite defensive skills in center. After playing in only 61 games in Low-A last season due to injuries, the Cubs were aggressive in assigning the 20-year-old to the High-A Florida State League. He hasn’t been totally over-matched, but an improvement in his production would keep him as an option in the cluttered Cubs’ future.

34. Raul Adalberto Mondesi, SS, Kansas City Royals: Mondesi is an interesting prospect due to the bloodlines and the fact that he is just 18 (until July 27) and he is playing in the High-A Carolina League in the Royals system. It’s the defensive skills and the speed that make him capable of being elite. While he likely won’t develop the power that Russell, Baez, and Correa bring to the prospect list, he can utilize that speed in the same way that Billy Hamilton has for the Cincinnati Reds to become a factor in all facets of the game.

 

Reds OF Jesse Winker
Reds OF Jesse Winker

35. Jesse Winker, OF, Cincinnati Reds: Winker will be a left fielder due to his arm, but he has the hit tool, the power, and the patience to be a very useful player in Cincinnati. He may have several seasons of All-Star production, while settling in as a productive, sweet-swinging lefty in the middle of the Reds’ order.

36. Braden Shipley, RHP, Arizona Diamondbacks: Shipley has a solid fastball and change already, but he has hit a bump with the numbers in the hitter-friendly California League. He has very little experience as a pitcher (he was a former shortstop), but still projects as a mid-rotation starter for the D-backs…if Kevin Towers doesn’t trade him because he hates young players (huge generalizations are always fun).

37. Hunter Dozier, 3B, Kansas City Royals: What seemed like a reach in the 2013 MLB Draft looks to be another wise decision by Dayton Moore and Company in K.C. Dozier looks to be the long-term solution at third with Mike Moustakas failing like a man with no arms trying to remove corn from his teeth. You’d like to see more power from a future corner man, but Dozier could transfer some of those doubles into bombs as he continues adjusting to the wooden bat throughout his maturation.

38. Clint Frazier, OF, Cleveland Indians: Frazier has Baez-like bat speed, which could result in huge amounts of power as he matures. The red-headed stepchild of the Tribe system, Frazier has shown glimpses of his potential while striking out in large quantities as a 19-year-old in full season ball. The Indians would be wise to continue being aggressive with him, allowing him to make adjustments and becoming the potential All-Star, a title that his bat could very well carry him to.

39. Jose Berrios, RHP, Minnesota Twins: Berrios could be the best of the group between himself, Meyer, and Stewart, but he doesn’t get as much love, likely, due to his size. Just touching six feet, Berrios falls into the “short pitcher” label that has haunted the likes of Yordano Ventura, Carlos Martinez, Johnny Cueto, and Pedro Martinez, but stuff will outweigh the oppression, and Berrios has plenty of it.

40. Dalton Pompey, OF, Toronto Blue Jays: Pompey has made huge strides this season in his production, showing his typical speed and solid plate discipline, while driving the ball more consistently. It has led to a promotion to Double-A (where he has struggled) for the 21-year-old center fielder. He looks like a nice piece for Toronto to build around, especially if they lose Colby Rasmus to free agency after the season (though, Pompey won’t be called upon just yet for that role in 2015).

41. Mark Appel, RHP, Houston Astros: Appel has had difficulty adjusting to the pitching methods that Houston employs in the minors, but maybe it’s an attitude thing more than a stuff thing…or an injury. Who knows at this point, but the Astros should be concerned if the stuff is there and the results are this horrific. He’s here because of that stuff, but he needs to get things going before he becomes a bust…yes…already.

42. Luis Severino, RHP, New York Yankees: The Yankees have a prospect! Severino isn’t just a hype-machine type of guy, he has a fastball that can touch 97 with a slider and a change that could be above-average. The 6’0″, right-hander will battle the “small” label, but the stuff could be special.

43. Nick Kingham, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates: A future mid-rotation, innings-eater with solid stuff who is close to making an impact, Kingham may get lost in the Cole, Taillon, and Glasnow hype, but he should be a very useful arm for the Pirates in his own right.

44. Stephen Piscotty, OF, St. Louis Cardinals: Piscotty looks to be a potential clone of Allen Craig, possessing impressive contact skills without taking many walks, while not striking out absurd amounts, and not showcasing power numbers that would make them an ideal corner bat. Still, Piscotty can double his way into credibility, and he will be a nice option to play alongside Oscar Taveras for several seasons in St. Louis.

45. A.J. Cole, RHP, Washington Nationals: Cole has rebounded with his return to Washington’s system. He didn’t take too kindly to his time in the California League for the Oakland A’s, but he still has the stuff of a potential No.2 or No.3 starter. He isn’t Giolito by any means, but he has legit stuff and may not get the love that he deserves due to the flip-flopping in trades the last couple of seasons.

46. Brandon Nimmo, OF, New York Mets: Nimmo’s on-base skills make him the Joey Votto of the minor leagues. He has control over his at-bats, which isn’t the norm for most 21-year-old position players in Double-A. Still, the Mets have to hope that he develops power along with the patience, as they are in desperate need of impact talent at the major league level.

Rangers' OF Nick Williams
Rangers’ OF Nick Williams

47. Nick Williams, OF, Texas Rangers: This kid can hit. He may not have a clue about how he can barrel up the ball, as the strikeouts show, but Williams has the talent to become an All-Star level outfielder due to his tools, athletic ability, and successful aggressiveness. There is power in his game, as well as speed, but he will settle in as a corner outfielder in Texas, though, there could be some severe learning curves.

48. Josh Bell, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates: Bell is a switch-hitting corner outfielder who can hit for power from both sides, he has a strong grasp of the strike zone, and he has rewarded the Pirates, who made a $5 million investment in him after choosing the Texas-native in the 2nd round of the 2011 MLB Draft, with impressive production after an injury-filled start to his career. He should see some time in Double-A this season, while turning 22 in August.

49. Matt Wisler, RHP, San Diego Padres: Wisler’s numbers in the Pacific Coast League are pretty horrific, but he’ll be reaping the benefits of pitching in San Diego in due time. Mostly working on his change this season, Wisler continues to work his way to the majors, and the results don’t matter as much as continued health and innings. He should be a solid No.2 or No.3 for the Padres in coming seasons.

50. D.J. Peterson, 3B, Seattle Mariners: Peterson’s overall numbers were likely aided by playing at Inland Empire in the California League, but he was a top selection in the 2013 MLB Draft and is continuing his offensive outburst after a recent to Double-A. The Mariners could use a productive right-handed hitter, but his future is likely not at third with Kyle Seager becoming an All-Star caliber player for Seattle. He could be a first baseman or the Mariners could give him a look in left, but they may need to cover him up with an elite-level defensive center fielder.

HONORABLE MENTION:

Jorge Soler, OF, Chicago Cubs; Michael Lorenzen, RHP, Cincinnati Reds; Hunter Renfroe, OF, San Diego Padres; Alex Reyes, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals; Miguel Almonte, RHP, Kansas City Royals; Kyle Zimmer, RHP, Kansas City Royals; Tim Anderson, SS, Chicago White Sox; Sean Manaea, LHP, Kansas City Royals; Austin Meadows, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates; Kyle Crick, RHP, San Francisco Giants; Lewis Brinson, OF, Texas Rangers;

 

 

 

 

Minor League Report, 6/29

With nearly three months of the season finished, the prospect status for many has changed. This winter, I released a Top 100 prospect list, but players take leaps or go through hot streaks that make you take notice, and that is what this report was created for. You may see names you’re not familiar with, but you could see new names or lesser known names that the rest of the world needs to take note of.

Jose Berrios, RHP, Minnesota Twins

Year Age AgeDif Lev W L ERA G CG SHO IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP H9 SO/W
2012 18 -2.4 Rk 3 0 1.17 11 0 0 30.2 15 4 4 1 4 49 0.620 4.4 12.25
2013 19 -2.8 A 7 7 3.99 19 0 0 103.2 105 58 46 6 40 100 1.399 9.1 2.50
2014 20 -3.2 A+ 8 2 2.05 14 1 1 83.1 67 26 19 3 21 98 1.056 7.2 4.67
3 Seasons 18 9 2.85 44 1 1 217.2 187 88 69 10 65 247 1.158 7.7 3.80
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/29/2014.
Twins' RHP Jose Berrios
Twins’ RHP Jose Berrios

Berrios has taken steps towards stardom in the 2014 season, and while he may always have the “short” label on his (due to just touching 6′), he has the stuff and mound presence to overcome that – like Yordano Ventura and Johnny Cueto. Over his last nine starts, Berrios has allowed eight earned runs over 58.1 innings (1.23 ERA), 36 hits, and 14 walks (0.86), all while striking out 78 (12.03 K/9). The Twins have Byron Buxton, Jorge Polanco, and Miguel Sano to help the club in the future offensively, and Berrios looks like he could become the first strong Minnesota-developed pitcher since Brad Radke.

Nick Kingham, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates

Year Age AgeDif Lev W L ERA G CG SHO IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP H9 SO/W
2010 18 -2.4 Rk 0 0 0.00 2 0 0 3.0 3 0 0 0 0 2 1.000 9.0
2011 19 -2.3 A- 6 2 2.15 15 0 0 71.0 63 18 17 5 15 47 1.099 8.0 3.13
2012 20 -1.6 A 6 8 4.39 27 0 0 127.0 115 70 62 15 36 117 1.189 8.1 3.25
2013 21 -2.9 AA-A+ 9 6 2.89 27 0 0 143.1 125 49 46 7 44 144 1.179 7.8 3.27
2013 21 -2.1 A+ 6 3 3.09 13 0 0 70.0 55 25 24 6 14 75 0.986 7.1 5.36
2013 21 -3.6 AA 3 3 2.70 14 0 0 73.1 70 24 22 1 30 69 1.364 8.6 2.30
2014 22 -3.3 AA-AAA 3 7 2.45 15 0 0 91.2 82 37 25 3 28 69 1.200 8.1 2.46
2014 22 -2.8 AA 1 7 3.04 12 0 0 71.0 71 35 24 3 25 54 1.352 9.0 2.16
2014 22 -5.0 AAA 2 0 0.44 3 0 0 20.2 11 2 1 0 3 15 0.677 4.8 5.00
5 Seasons 24 23 3.10 86 0 0 436.0 388 174 150 30 123 379 1.172 8.0 3.08
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/29/2014.

Kingham has put up strong numbers at every stop outside of the hitter-friendly Sally League, and after a promotion to Triple-A, his numbers have been electric. His numbers do not indicate that he is a front-line starter, but Gerrit Cole and Jameson Taillon weren’t necessarily showing high strikeout numbers during their ascension, either. He could see time in Pittsburgh this season due to his results to this point, which is a pretty spectacular feat for a 22-year-old who has always been an afterthought to Cole, Taillon, and Tyler Glasnow in the Pirates system to many prospect sites. The fastball can touch 97, he has a power curve, and it wouldn’t be surprising if the results mimic Cole’s early on for the Pirates.

Kyle Schwarber, C/OF, Chicago Cubs

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2014 21 -0.4 A-A- 14 60 50 18 26 5 1 8 19 1 7 7 .520 .583 1.140 1.723 57
2014 21 -0.3 A- 5 24 20 7 12 1 1 4 10 0 2 2 .600 .625 1.350 1.975 27
2014 21 -0.5 A 9 36 30 11 14 4 0 4 9 1 5 5 .467 .556 1.000 1.556 30
1 Season 14 60 50 18 26 5 1 8 19 1 7 7 .520 .583 1.140 1.723 57
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/29/2014.

After being taken 4th overall in this month’s MLB Draft, Kyle Schwarber signed quickly and started playing. The Cubs took him due to his signability and the fact that he should move quickly as the most advanced collegiate bat in the draft. The result speak to those expectations, and it seems unreasonable to have him at any level other than High-A or Double-A at this point, as he is toying with the pitching in the lower levels. He has 14 extra-base hits in 14 games with 19 RBI and a 1.723 OPS. There are small sample sizes and then there are players who are that much better. Schwarber is that much better and needs a tougher test. He could be developing the same type of offensive skills that Kris Bryant has had in the minors this season, and if he reaches that level, the Cubs look very intelligent for a pick that many considered a reach.

Henry Owens, LHP, Boston Red Sox

Year Age AgeDif Lev W L ERA GS CG SHO IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP H9 SO/W
2012 19 -2.6 A 12 5 4.87 22 0 0 101.2 100 58 55 10 47 130 1.446 8.9 2.77
2013 20 -3.2 A+-AA 11 6 2.67 26 0 0 135.0 84 47 40 9 68 169 1.126 5.6 2.49
2013 20 -2.8 A+ 8 5 2.92 20 0 0 104.2 66 39 34 6 53 123 1.137 5.7 2.32
2013 20 -4.6 AA 3 1 1.78 6 0 0 30.1 18 8 6 3 15 46 1.088 5.3 3.07
2014 21 -3.8 AA 10 3 2.25 15 3 2 92.0 59 24 23 5 37 95 1.043 5.8 2.57
3 Seasons 33 14 3.23 63 3 2 328.2 243 129 118 24 152 394 1.202 6.7 2.59
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/29/2014.
Red Sox LHP Henry Owens
Red Sox LHP Henry Owens

The Boston Red Sox are in an interesting situation, with so many aging veterans on the decline and so many young, talented prospects becoming ready at the same time, they need to decide if they’re going to reload through trades (using the young talent) or build for the future with their young players. Mookie Betts, Xander Bogaerts, and Jackie Bradley are on the 25-man roster entering play today, but the club sent down Rubby De La Rosa, while keeping the struggling Jake Peavy in the rotation. Sneaking up the organizational ladder to push the vets in the rotation further is Henry Owens, who has been dominant since the beginning of the 2013 season. While he could still refine his command a bit, you have a power left-hander here, who could become a top-of-the-rotation arm. His last 10 Double-A starts have resulted in a 1.56 ERA and a 0.93 WHIP over 63.1 innings, allowing a .155 average to opposing batters. That 1.56 ERA, by the way, includes the four runs he allowed over five innings on June 26. His previous nine starts, that ERA was 1.10. He has 21 Double-A starts under his belt and is ready for Triple-A at the age of 21.

A.J. Cole, RHP, Washington Nationals

Year Age AgeDif Lev W L ERA G CG SHO IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP H9 SO/W
2010 18 -3.3 A- 0 0 0.00 1 0 0 1.0 1 0 0 0 1 1 2.000 9.0 1.00
2011 19 -2.8 A 4 7 4.04 20 0 0 89.0 87 47 40 6 24 108 1.247 8.8 4.50
2012 20 -2.2 A-A+ 6 10 3.70 27 0 0 133.2 138 72 55 14 29 133 1.249 9.3 4.59
2012 20 -1.8 A 6 3 2.07 19 0 0 95.2 78 32 22 7 19 102 1.014 7.3 5.37
2012 20 -3.2 A+ 0 7 7.82 8 0 0 38.0 60 40 33 7 10 31 1.842 14.2 3.10
2013 21 -2.4 A+-AA 10 5 3.60 25 0 0 142.2 127 63 57 15 33 151 1.121 8.0 4.58
2013 21 -1.8 A+ 6 3 4.25 18 0 0 97.1 96 50 46 12 23 102 1.223 8.9 4.43
2013 21 -3.6 AA 4 2 2.18 7 0 0 45.1 31 13 11 3 10 49 0.904 6.2 4.90
2014 22 -3.0 AA-AAA 6 3 2.82 15 1 1 76.2 87 36 24 2 16 66 1.343 10.2 4.13
2014 22 -2.8 AA 6 3 2.92 14 1 1 71.0 79 30 23 1 15 61 1.324 10.0 4.07
2014 22 -5.0 AAA 0 0 1.59 1 0 0 5.2 8 6 1 1 1 5 1.588 12.7 5.00
5 Seasons 26 25 3.58 88 1 1 443.0 440 218 176 37 103 459 1.226 8.9 4.46
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/29/2014.

It seems like Cole has been around for a long time. He was sent to the Oakland A’s by the Nationals in the 2011 Gio Gonzalez deal, but Washington re-acquired him in the three-team deal that sent Michael Morse to Seattle and John Jaso to Oakland prior to the 2013 season. Cole struggled mightily once reaching Stockton in the California League within Oakland’s system, and it may have rattled him a bit; however, upon returning to the Nationals, his strikeout numbers jumped back up, and, since being promoted to Double-A late in the 2013 season, he has looked like his earlier forms, striking out a lot of batters while limiting walks. He can command a mid-90’s fastball and he is just 22. He may get overlooked due to the fact that he has been traded, but if no one else wants him, you should hope your favorite team does. He isn’t Stephen Strasburg, and he doesn’t have the hype of Lucas Giolito, but A.J. Cole could be a very good pitcher in MLB very soon.

Darnell Sweeney, 2B/SS, Los Angeles Dodgers

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2012 21 -0.4 A-Rk 67 308 265 46 78 9 6 5 33 27 33 49 .294 .374 .430 .804 114
2012 21 0.1 Rk 16 79 66 12 20 1 2 0 10 10 9 8 .303 .380 .379 .759 25
2012 21 -0.6 A 51 229 199 34 58 8 4 5 23 17 24 41 .291 .372 .447 .819 89
2013 22 -0.9 A+ 134 613 552 79 152 34 16 11 77 48 43 151 .275 .329 .455 .784 251
2014 23 -1.6 AA 77 347 292 53 92 24 2 8 34 9 45 68 .315 .406 .493 .900 144
3 Seasons 278 1268 1109 178 322 67 24 24 144 84 121 268 .290 .361 .459 .820 509
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/29/2014.

The Dodgers have money to spend like no other team in baseball, but they still have to have a minor league system. They have a lot of solid prospects that everyone should know, like Julio Urias, Joc Pederson, and Corey Seager, but it doesn’t stop there. Sweeney is an interesting prospect who I have never read a single thing about. At 23, he is a collegiate draftee (13th round in 2012) out of Central Florida, who has put up solid but not spectacular numbers in the minors since being selected by Los Angeles. His numbers in the California League were a bit inflated, especially his strikeout numbers, but Sweeney does have some power and speed, and in 2014 he is showing quite a bit more patience at the dish than he has in previous seasons. With Alex Guerrero and Dee Gordon ahead of his at second and short at the Major League level and Seager quickly coming up to likely take over third, there isn’t much room for him in the future. He could quietly become a very interesting trade piece, especially if he consistently shows the plate discipline while maintaining the solid pop that he has displayed this season as a switch-hitting middle infielder.

Nick Williams, OF, Texas Rangers

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2012 18 -1.4 Rk 48 224 201 34 63 9 6 2 27 15 16 50 .313 .375 .448 .823 90
2013 19 -2.6 A 95 404 376 70 110 19 12 17 60 8 15 110 .293 .337 .543 .879 204
2014 20 -2.8 A+-Rk 58 251 232 40 72 17 2 7 44 3 11 65 .310 .359 .491 .850 114
2014 20 0.4 Rk 3 14 13 3 4 0 1 0 2 0 1 2 .308 .357 .462 .819 6
2014 20 -3.0 A+ 55 237 219 37 68 17 1 7 42 3 10 63 .311 .359 .493 .852 108
3 Seasons 201 879 809 144 245 45 20 26 131 26 42 225 .303 .353 .504 .857 408
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/29/2014.
Rangers' OF Nick Williams
Rangers’ OF Nick Williams

Williams missed a couple of weeks due to injury, but he has six hits (including two home runs) with two walks in four games since coming back. That is notable because he had only eight walks in 51 games for Myrtle Beach prior to missing time. Williams is a hitter, possibly a hacker. He goes up and he swings, and he manages to produce with no real plan at the plate. You don’t see many players hitting .300 in the majors with over 100 strikeouts and about 20 walks, but Williams could be that guy. He’s 6’3″ and pretty lanky, so as he matures and strengthens his frame, the ability to put the barrel on the ball will lead to balls flying out of the park. He could be very special, though the numbers, at times, could look very confusing.

Minor League Report, 6/14

Cubs super-prospect 3B Kris Bryant
Cubs super-prospect 3B Kris Bryant

The 2014 season has been quite interesting to this point. With so many teams floating around contention due to unforeseen parity in a game that has had so little over the years, we haven’t seen many top talents reach the big leagues to assist their clubs compete. Gregory Polanco finally reached Pittsburgh, but the Cardinals just sent Oscar Taveras back to the minors following the activation of Matt Adams from the 15-day disabled list. With injuries to Byron Buxton, Miguel Sano, Archie Bradley, and Taijuan Walker, the elite level prospects haven’t provided a lot of positive material for minor league analysis. For that reason, you have to reach deeper. Here are some names that you may be familiar with, but, if you’re not, you should get to know a little better.

Kris Bryant, 3B, Chicago Cubs

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2013 21 -0.8 A–A+-Rk 36 146 128 22 43 14 2 9 32 1 11 35 .336 .390 .688 1.078 88
2013 21 1.3 Rk 2 7 6 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 .167 .143 .333 .476 2
2013 21 -0.2 A- 18 77 65 13 23 8 1 4 16 0 8 17 .354 .416 .692 1.108 45
2013 21 -1.8 A+ 16 62 57 9 19 5 1 5 14 1 3 17 .333 .387 .719 1.106 41
2014 22 -2.6 AA 66 286 240 60 86 19 0 22 57 8 41 75 .358 .462 .713 1.174 171
2 Seasons 102 432 368 82 129 33 2 31 89 9 52 110 .351 .438 .704 1.141 259
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

Bryant is a one-man wrecking crew in the Double-A Southern League in 2014, and you should already be familiar with him, as Bryant was the No.2 overall pick out of San Diego in the 2013 MLB Draft. For all of the fears that went along with the holes in his swing, which is still present based on the 75 strikeouts, Bryant can still draw a walk while producing elite-level power from the right side. He may have to move to an outfield corner in the long run due to Starlin Castro being at short and Javier Baez likely moving to third, as the Cubs have Anthony Rizzo locked up through 2021 (including options) at first. Regardless of where he plays, he’ll be an All-Star talent. The Cubs don’t need to bring him up due to their 27-38 record and ongoing rebuild, but the scariest part of his numbers are the fact that they could only get larger with a move to Triple-A and the Pacific Coast League. He could break camp with the Cubs in 2015 and will likely get a nice audition this September.

Victor Sanchez, RHP, Seattle Mariners

Year Age AgeDif Lev W L ERA GS CG SHO IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP H9 BB9 SO9 SO/W
2012 17 -4.3 A- 6 2 3.18 15 0 0 85.0 69 37 30 5 27 69 1.129 7.3 2.9 7.3 2.56
2013 18 -3.8 A 6 6 2.78 20 1 1 113.1 106 42 35 4 18 79 1.094 8.4 1.4 6.3 4.39
2014 19 -5.5 AA 3 2 4.06 9 1 1 44.1 45 26 20 10 12 39 1.286 9.1 2.4 7.9 3.25
3 Seasons 15 10 3.15 44 2 2 242.2 220 105 85 19 57 187 1.141 8.2 2.1 6.9 3.28
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

The Mariners have a lot of young pitchers who get a lot of attention with Taijuan Walker, James Paxton, and Erasmo Ramirez each earning some starts at the major league level over the last couple of seasons; however, with those names receiving so much attention, there is a sneaky exciting talent coming up who isn’t getting nearly as much recognition as most players with his skills would, and that is Victor Sanchez. At 19, Sanchez is already in Double-A, having skipped the horrific pitching environment of the California League, and he is pitching very well. Over his last two starts, Sanchez has allowed just two earned runs over 13.2 innings (1.32 ERA), striking out 13 and allowing 11 base runners (0.80 WHIP). Sanchez isn’t a dynamic strikeout pitcher, but he has plus command and, at his age, he may further develop his stuff to take another step forward. He could certainly give up fewer home runs, but when you consider that he is 5 1/2 years younger than the average player in the Southern League, he deserves a break. He’s a very mature pitcher given his age and deserves more attention than he is getting.

Astros OF Preston Tucker
Astros OF Preston Tucker

 

Preston Tucker, OF, Houston Astros

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2012 21 -0.1 A- 42 187 165 32 53 7 0 8 38 1 18 16 .321 .390 .509 .899 84
2013 22 -1.4 A+-AA 135 601 535 97 159 32 2 25 103 3 56 91 .297 .368 .505 .872 270
2013 22 -0.9 A+ 75 333 298 61 97 18 1 15 74 3 29 45 .326 .384 .544 .928 162
2013 22 -2.0 AA 60 268 237 36 62 14 1 10 29 0 27 46 .262 .347 .456 .803 108
2014 23 -1.2 AA-AAA 66 294 265 42 73 17 0 17 43 3 26 48 .275 .347 .532 .879 141
2014 23 -1.2 AA 65 290 261 41 72 17 0 17 43 3 26 46 .276 .348 .536 .885 140
2014 23 -3.7 AAA 1 4 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 .250 .250 .250 .500 1
3 Seasons 243 1082 965 171 285 56 2 50 184 7 100 155 .295 .366 .513 .879 495
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

Another Houston Astros prospect who is near ready to make an impact at the major league level, Tucker was just promoted to Triple-A after being near the top of the Texas League in doubles, home runs, and total bases. After thriving in 2013 between High-A and Double-A, Tucker has made the adjustments necessary to continue his progression to Houston to join Jon Singleton and George Springer, while the club waits for Carlos Correa and others in the lower minors to help make Houston a World Series contender in the next three seasons. Even thriving against left-handers, Tucker is capable of being more than just an average outfielder in the majors.

Christian Walker, 1B, Baltimore Orioles

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2012 21 -0.1 A- 22 93 81 12 23 5 0 2 9 2 10 14 .284 .376 .420 .796 34
2013 22 -0.7 A+-A-AA 103 439 393 51 118 27 0 11 56 2 34 67 .300 .362 .453 .815 178
2013 22 0.4 A 31 131 116 19 41 5 0 3 20 0 11 16 .353 .420 .474 .894 55
2013 22 -0.8 A+ 55 239 215 25 62 17 0 8 35 2 17 41 .288 .343 .479 .822 103
2013 22 -2.4 AA 17 69 62 7 15 5 0 0 1 0 6 10 .242 .319 .323 .641 20
2014 23 -1.6 AA 65 284 258 43 79 10 1 17 58 1 22 58 .306 .363 .550 .913 142
3 Seasons 190 816 732 106 220 42 1 30 123 5 66 139 .301 .364 .484 .848 354
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

After being taken in the 4th round of the 2012 MLB Draft out of South Carolina, Christian Walker had a somewhat productive first full minor league season in 2013 (.815 OPS, just 67 strikeouts in 439 plate appearances), but it was also somewhat disappointing (11 home runs). Walker did play at three levels in 2013, so, perhaps, he wasn’t in one location long enough to make the adjustments necessary to showcase his power, but the 2014 season has been quite different. Walker already has 17 home runs and is sporting an OPS of .913 as of publishing. While his strikeout rate has increased, that is allowing him to produce at higher levels. With Chris Davis under team control through the 2015 season, could you be looking at the future first baseman in Baltimore? It could be the case, but Walker has to continue his offensive outburst if he is going to make it in the majors as a right-handed hitting first baseman.

Rymer Liriano, OF, San Diego Padres

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2008 17 -1.5 FRk 67 267 232 34 46 13 1 9 37 9 28 106 .198 .296 .379 .675 88
2009 18 -2.2 Rk 50 216 197 44 69 8 1 8 44 14 15 52 .350 .398 .523 .921 103
2010 19 -2.5 A–A-A+ 117 481 441 59 102 26 7 3 38 31 32 119 .231 .288 .342 .630 151
2010 19 -2.3 A- 53 225 203 35 55 13 6 0 12 17 17 53 .271 .335 .394 .729 80
2010 19 -2.4 A 50 201 188 21 36 11 1 2 20 11 10 54 .191 .234 .293 .526 55
2010 19 -3.8 A+ 14 55 50 3 11 2 0 1 6 3 5 12 .220 .291 .320 .611 16
2011 20 -1.7 A-A+ 131 580 510 89 152 31 9 12 68 66 53 108 .298 .365 .465 .830 237
2011 20 -1.6 A 116 519 455 81 145 30 8 12 62 65 47 95 .319 .383 .499 .882 227
2011 20 -2.7 A+ 15 61 55 8 7 1 1 0 6 1 6 13 .127 .213 .182 .395 10
2012 21 -2.2 A+-AA 127 520 465 65 130 32 4 8 61 32 41 119 .280 .350 .417 .767 194
2012 21 -1.6 A+ 74 314 282 41 84 22 2 5 41 22 21 69 .298 .360 .443 .803 125
2012 21 -3.1 AA 53 206 183 24 46 10 2 3 20 10 20 50 .251 .335 .377 .712 69
2014 23 -1.2 AA 66 282 252 38 69 14 2 11 40 10 25 73 .274 .344 .476 .820 120
6 Seasons 558 2346 2097 329 568 124 24 51 288 162 194 577 .271 .338 .426 .764 893
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

Even after missing all of the 2013 season due to Tommy John surgery, Rymer Liriano is young for his league. The 22-year-old outfielder is back on track, showcasing all of his tools, though the swing and miss looks to be a bit larger than anticipated after his long layoff. Regardless, in 2011, Liriano showed the speed (66 steals) and power (50 extra-base hits) that make fantasy baseball fans salivate. He could probably make the Padres offense a little better if he were called up today, but he still has some work to do to become an All-Star level talent in the future.

Luke Jackson, RHP, Texas Rangers

Year Age AgeDif Lev W L ERA GS CG SHO IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP H9 BB9 SO9 SO/W
2011 19 -2.8 A 5 6 5.64 19 0 0 75.0 83 57 47 9 48 78 1.747 10.0 5.8 9.4 1.63
2012 20 -2.3 A+-A 10 7 4.65 26 1 0 129.2 130 72 67 6 65 146 1.504 9.0 4.5 10.1 2.25
2012 20 -1.6 A 5 5 4.92 13 1 0 64.0 63 37 35 4 33 72 1.500 8.9 4.6 10.1 2.18
2012 20 -2.9 A+ 5 2 4.39 13 0 0 65.2 67 35 32 2 32 74 1.508 9.2 4.4 10.1 2.31
2013 21 -2.2 A+-AA 11 4 2.04 23 0 0 128.0 92 32 29 6 59 134 1.180 6.5 4.1 9.4 2.27
2013 21 -1.8 A+ 9 4 2.41 19 0 0 101.0 79 30 27 6 47 104 1.248 7.0 4.2 9.3 2.21
2013 21 -3.5 AA 2 0 0.67 4 0 0 27.0 13 2 2 0 12 30 0.926 4.3 4.0 10.0 2.50
2014 22 -2.5 AA 7 2 2.86 12 0 0 72.1 50 23 23 5 19 74 0.954 6.2 2.4 9.2 3.89
4 Seasons 33 19 3.69 80 1 0 405.0 355 184 166 26 191 432 1.348 7.9 4.2 9.6 2.26
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

Prior to the 2013 season, Jackson was heading towards becoming an organizational arm, even though he was a first round draft pick in 2010. Then, it all seemed to click last year and over his last 200.1 innings he has a 2.34 ERA, a 1.10 WHIP, and 208 strikeouts. Now, with the Texas Rangers reeling and in need of pitching depth after injuries to Derek Holland, Martin Perez, and Matt Harrison, Luke Jackson has positioned himself for some time in Arlington at some point this summer.

Taylor
Nationals OF Michael Taylor

Michael Taylor, OF, Washington Nationals

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2010 19 -0.9 Rk-A 43 164 141 14 28 5 3 1 13 1 15 33 .199 .276 .298 .574 42
2010 19 -0.7 Rk 38 149 128 14 25 4 3 1 12 1 14 31 .195 .270 .297 .567 38
2010 19 -2.6 A 5 15 13 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 .231 .333 .308 .641 4
2011 20 -1.4 A 126 488 442 64 112 26 7 13 68 23 32 120 .253 .310 .432 .742 191
2012 21 -1.6 A+ 109 431 384 51 93 33 2 3 37 19 40 113 .242 .318 .362 .680 139
2013 22 -0.8 A+ 133 581 509 79 134 41 6 10 87 51 55 131 .263 .340 .426 .767 217
2014 23 -1.6 AA 62 271 233 50 77 11 2 16 49 17 32 83 .330 .416 .601 1.017 140
5 Seasons 473 1935 1709 258 444 116 20 43 254 111 174 480 .260 .333 .427 .759 729
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

Michael Taylor is breaking out. After an impressive repeat of High-A in 2013 (57 extra-base hits and 51 stolen bases), Taylor has reached a career-high in home runs in just 62 games, while still showing tremendous speed (17 steals) in his first go-round in Double-A. There is a lot of swing and miss in his bat, but the power and speed skills that he possesses make him an intriguing prospect, especially when you consider that he could be in a pretty electric lineup with Bryce Harper, Anthony Rendon, and company in the next couple of seasons. With Denard Span due a $9 million option or a $500,000 buyout in 2015, Taylor is likely leaving a lot of questions for Nationals General Manager Mike Rizzo and Washington management about just what to do in center field in 2015. If nothing else, Taylor could spend some time in Triple-A next year, or even later this season, before earning a full-time role in 2016.

Jake Lamb, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks

Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB
2012 21 0.1 Rk 67 315 280 47 92 22 5 9 57 8 24 51 .329 .390 .539 .930 151
2013 22 -0.7 A+-Rk 69 304 248 48 75 22 0 13 52 0 50 75 .302 .421 .548 .969 136
2013 22 2.3 Rk 5 21 17 4 5 2 0 0 5 0 2 5 .294 .381 .412 .793 7
2013 22 -0.9 A+ 64 283 231 44 70 20 0 13 47 0 48 70 .303 .424 .558 .982 129
2014 23 -1.6 AA 65 273 239 42 78 25 4 11 55 0 25 58 .326 .399 .603 1.002 144
3 Seasons 201 892 767 137 245 69 9 33 164 8 99 184 .319 .404 .562 .966 431
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/14/2014.

Jake Lamb was a 6th round pick out of Washington in 2012, and all that he has done since getting drafted is hit. This season, his numbers in the Southern League are being mocked by Kris Bryant’s absurd outburst, but they are still very, very good. The doubles and home runs show the power potential in Lamb’s bat, and the .996 OPS in 59 at-bats against left-handed pitching shows that Lamb is quite capable of becoming a regular in Arizona. With Kevin Towers around, Lamb could be traded before ever reaching the desert, but he would be an extremely solid option to force Martin Prado off of the hot corner, and joining Paul Goldschmidt as a tremendous offensive threat in the Diamondbacks lineup in the near future.