Tag: Juan Soto

Washington Nationals: Soto is a Star

The Pending Free Agency Doom of Bryce Harper is Healed and…Forgotten???

Robles1
Robles will return this season. He was ranked higher than Soto, but will he produce in the same way?

At the end of the 2017 season, Nationals all-world super-prospect Victor Robles made his arrival to Washington and showed some of the power and speed (two triples) that made him the No.4 prospect (MLB.com, I, personally, had him No.6) in all of baseball heading into the 2018 season. He would, likely, be in Washington right now if not for his hyperextended elbow, which shelved him on April 9th at Triple-A Syracuse. Sadly, his injury has opened the door for a new player, Juan Soto, who is never going to give up his spot.

Padres Nationals Baseball
This teen is producing in ways not seen for quite some time.

Soto was a highly ranked prospect in his own right. He signed for $1.5 million in 2015 out of the Dominican Republic. At the tender age of 19, he has obliterated every minor league level, posting a .362/.434/.609 line, with 30 doubles, eight triples, 20 bombs, and a 66:58 K:BB in all of 512 minor league plate appearances. He played in all of eight games at Double-A before jumping to the majors, where he has done nothing short but continue to rake, posting a .344/.447/.641 line in his first 20 games and 76 plate appearances (going into Friday’s game).This is one teenager who has lived up to the hype. As someone who has watched the entire career of Bryce Harper, I can comfortably say that Juan Soto’s arrival will make his departure from Washington an easier pill to swallow. For all of the love that Harper receives, and don’t get me wrong – he is a gifted player, he hasn’t had the career that warrants the type of contract that some sad team will inexcusably hand him and Scott Boras after the 2018 season. Sure, he has youth on his side – he’ll be just 26 this October- but youth and prior production doesn’t lead to years of production in later seasons. You can look at the contracts of Jason Heyward with Chicago, Chris Davis in Baltimore, and Jacoby Ellsbury in New York for the possible void of truth in that type of logic.

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Harper is as good as gone…or is he?

Harper’s best season was his 2015 MVP campaign. He followed that up with a down 2016, an injury-shortened 2017, and an interesting start to the 2018 season. He’s leading the NL in both home runs  (19) and walks (50), while currently sporting the worst average of his career (.224). Despite that low average, his OPS would rank the 3rd highest of his career. The .213 BABIP doesn’t help, nor does his ability (or inability) to hit against the shift. There was an amazing article on his lack of success this season at Fangraphs that you should read, and the trends have continued since the article was published on 6/5. Still, who in their right mind would bank $300 million or the $400 million that some think it would take over a decade to a player who peaked at 22? The Nationals should feel comfortable not being that team. They have Max Scherzer through 2021 and Stephen Strasburg through 2023, Robles could be another producer, while Soto has, albeit in a small sample size, proven that his minor league, video-game-like production could be his norm at the top level. This is a team that can build in more productive ways than the franchise debilitating super-contract that would come with re-signing their star.

Juan Soto, a 19-year-old who became the first teenager to hit two home runs and walk once in the history of Yankee Stadium, a young man they call the “Childish Bambino”, a young man who can’t possess a Budweiser but does possess the barreling bat of a dynamic veteran, has taken over the future of the franchise in Washington. As fans watch Harper have a season of three outcomes, they can see this star in the making give a glimpse of life without the hard-nosed, oft-injured star, resting comfortably in what the future holds.

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2017 Midseason Top 75 Prospects

I’m a little beyond the midpoint in preparing this, but…life. Find an updated list of my original 2017 prospect list below:

  1. Yoan Moncada, 2B/3B, Chicago White Sox

    One of several pieces from the Sale trade, Moncada is a freak
    Courtesy: Zimbio
  2. Gleyber Torres, SS, New York Yankees
  3. Vladimir Guerrero, Jr., 3B, Toronto Blue Jays
  4. Eloy Jimenez, OF, Chicago White Sox
  5. Amed Rosario, SS, New York Mets
  6. Rafael Devers, 3B, Boston Red Sox
  7. Victor Robles, OF, Washington Nationals
  8. Brendan Rodgers, SS, Colorado Rockies
  9. Ronald Acuna, OF, Atlanta Braves
  10. Francisco Mejia, C, Cleveland Indians
  11. Nick Senzel, 3B, Cincinnati Reds
  12. Kyle Tucker, OF, Houston Astros
  13. Brent Honeywell, RHP, Tampa Bay Rays
  14. Lewis Brinson, OF, Milwaukee Brewers
  15. Alex Reyes, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
  16. Juan Soto, OF, Washington Nationals
  17. Willy Adames, SS, Tampa Bay Rays
  18. Mitch Keller, RHP, Pittsburgh Pirates
  19. Walker Buehler, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers
  20. Michael Kopech, RHP, Chicago White Sox
  21. Austin Meadows, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates
  22. A.J. Puk, LHP, Oakland Athletics
  23. Triston McKenzie, RHP, Cleveland Indians
  24. Nick Gordon, SS, Minnesota Twins
  25. Kolby Allard, LHP, Atlanta Braves
  26. Chance Sisco, C, Baltimore Orioles
  27. Ozzie Albies, 2B, Atlanta Braves
  28. Franklin Barreto, SS, Oakland Athletics
  29. Sixto Sanchez, RHP, Philadelphia Phillies
  30. Fernando Tatis, Jr., SS, San Diego Padres
  31. Bo Bichette, SS, Toronto Blue Jays
  32. J.P. Crawford, SS, Philadelphia Phillies
  33. Alex Verdugo, OF, Los Angeles Dodgers
  34. Cal Quantrill, RHP, San Diego Padres
  35. Mike Soroka, RHP, Atlanta Braves
  36. Hunter Greene, RHP, Cincinnati Reds

    The Reds got the best player in the draft at No.2 overall.
    Courtesy: MLB.com
  37. Leody Taveras, OF, Texas Rangers
  38. MacKenzie Gore, LHP, San Diego Padres
  39. Blake Rutherford, OF, New York Yankees
  40. Yadier Alvarez, RHP, Los Angeles Dodgers
  41. Franklin Perez, RHP, Houston Astros
  42. Carson Kelly, C, St. Louis Cardinals
  43. Chance Adams, RHP, New York Yankees
  44. Sandy Alcantara, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
  45. Royce Lewis, SS, Minnesota Twins
  46. Ryan Mountcastle, SS, Baltimore Orioles
  47. Sean Newcomb, LHP, Atlanta Braves
  48. Kyle Wright, RHP, Atlanta Braves
  49. Brendan McKay, LHP/1B, Tampa Bay Rays
  50. Isan Diaz, SS, Milwaukee Brewers
  51. Jorge Alfaro, C, Philadelphia Phillies
  52. Jason Groome, LHP, Boston Red Sox
  53. Luis Robert, OF, Chicago White Sox
  54. Riley Pint, RHP, Colorado Rockies
  55. Justus Sheffield, LHP, New York Yankees
  56. Dominic Smith, 1B, New York Mets
  57. Scott Kingery, 2B, Philadelphia Phillies
  58. Ian Anderson, RHP, Atlanta Braves
  59. Reynaldo Lopez, RHP, Chicago White Sox
  60. Derek Fisher, OF, Houston Astros
  61. Jack Flaherty, RHP, St. Louis Cardinals
  62. Alex Faedo, RHP, Detroit Tigers
  63. Kyle Lewis, OF, Seattle Mariners
  64. Anthony Banda, LHP, Arizona Diamondbacks
  65. Estevan Florial, OF, New York Yankees
  66. Kevin Maitan, SS, Atlanta Braves
  67. Lucas Giolito, RHP, Chicago White Sox

    Giolito hasn’t lived up to the hype, but the stuff is still there – and unharnessed.
  68. Beau Burrows, RHP, Detroit Tigers
  69. Dylan Cease, RHP, Chicago White Sox
  70. Adrian Morejon, LHP, San Diego Padres
  71. Chris Shaw, 1B/OF, San Francisco Giants
  72. Michael Chavis, 3B, Boston Red Sox
  73. Lourdes Gurriel, SS, Toronto Blue Jays
  74. Jesus Sanchez, OF, Tampa Bay Rays
  75. Willie Calhoun, 2B, Los Angeles Dodgers